Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering involves understanding the design, construction, operation and maintenance of machines or practically anything with moving parts.

What is Mechanical Engineering?

Mechanical engineers focus on turning energy into power and motion. They develop and design new products — such as mobile phones, gaming consoles, air conditioners, cars, aircraft and cameras — and the machines to make them. They manage the systems, people and technical facilities needed to produce goods and services, like power stations and manufacturing systems. They are concerned with the generation and harnessing of energy including solar heating and wind turbines.

What You Study

Core engineering studies include mathematics, systems design and engineering computation. Mechanical Engineering study areas include fluid mechanics and thermodynamics, design and manufacturing, control systems, and solid mechanics. At the Masters level, this specialisation looks at the generation, conversion and use of energy, as well as the design, construction and operation of devices and systems. Mechanical engineering students learn from staff with world-leading expertise in fluid mechanics, turbulence and biomechanics, and have the chance to undertake an industry project that combines a research and industry focus.

Career Outcomes

Group activities and site visits help to consolidate theoretical knowledge and prepare students to undertake careers in fields from automotive design and manufacturing to software programming and in non-engineering roles in organisations such as banks and consulting firms.

Mechanical Engineering Career Pathways brochure 836kb pdf

Accreditation

Dual accreditation with Engineers Australia and EUR-ACE® allows graduates of the Master of Engineering to practice as professional engineers virtually anywhere in the world. For more information see our accreditation page.

How to Become a Mechanical Engineer

Step 1

Mechanical Systems major in the Bachelor of Science

Mechanical Systems sequence in the Bachelor of Commerce

Step 2

Master of Engineering (Mechanical)
Graduate as an accredited Mechanical Engineer

Step 1: Mechanical Systems

The Mechanical Systems major may be taken as a part of the following degree. You can find out more on the following websites:

Bachelor of Commerce students may choose the Mechanical Systems sequence, and study between eight and ten engineering subjects as the breadth component of their degree. You can find out more about the degree on the following website:

Duration

300 credit points / 3 years full-time

Fees

For information please refer to the University’s Future Students website:

Domestics students International students


Course Structure

These example course plans are provided as a guide only. Subject availability will vary from year to year and there is no guarantee that the listed subjects will be available in future years.

Sample Course Plan — Bachelor of Science (major in Mechanical Systems)
Year 1 Semester 1 ENGR10004 Engineering Systems Design 1 MAST10005 Calculus 1 [1] PHYC10003 Physics 1 Breadth
Year 1 Semester 2 ENGR10003 Engineering Systems Design 2 MAST10006 Calculus 2 PHYC10004 Physics 2: Physical Science & Technology Breadth
Year 2 Semester 1 COMP20005 Engineering Computation MAST10007 Linear Algebra [1] Science elective Breadth
Year 2 Semester 2 ENGR20004 Engineering Mechanics MAST20029 Engineering Mathematics Science elective Breadth
Year 3 Semester 1 MCEN30016 Mechanical Dynamics MCEN30017 Mechanics & Materials Science elective Breadth
Year 3 Semester 2 MCEN30018 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics [2] MCEN30014 Mechanical Design Science elective Breadth

[1] Students who have completed VCE Specialist Mathematics with a study score ≥27, go straight into Calculus 2 and ‘replace’ Calculus 1 with a science elective. Linear Algebra is undertaken Year 1, Semester 2.

Students with ≥38 in VCE Specialist Mathematics 3/4 should seek advice as to which mathematics to take.

[2] Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics is available in both Semester 1 and 2.

Mechanical Systems subjects electives Breadth

Step 2: Master of Engineering (Mechanical)

Graduates with a Mechanical Systems major (with a 65% average) are eligible for a two-year Master of Engineering (Mechanical), or Master of Engineering (Mechanical with Business), or Master of Engineering (Mechatronics).

Sample Course Plan —Master of Engineering (Mechanical)
Year 4 Semester 1 MCEN90015 Thermodynamics ELEN90055 Control Systems MCEN90014 Materials MCEN90012 Design for Manufacture
Year 4 Semester 2 MCEN90008 Fluid Dynamics MCEN90026 Solid Mechanics MCEN90009 Dynamics of Machines MCEN90013 Design for Integration
Year 5 Semester 1 Group 1 MME elective Group 1 MME elective Group 2 MME elective MCEN90022 Capstone Project [1]
Year 5 Semester 2 Group 1 MME elective Group 1 MME elective

MME elective

OR

ELEN20005 Foundations of Electrical Networks [2]

[1] Available year long, or semester long — 25 points in either Semester 1 or 2.

[2] Students who have completed ELEN20005 undertake a MME elective.

Further Information

Master of Engineering (Mechanical) Master of Engineering (Mechanical with Business) Master of Engineering (Mechatronics)


Sample Course Plan — Bachelor of Commerce with a sequence of subjects in Mechanical Systems
Year 1 Semester 1 ECON10004 Introductory Microeconomics [3] ECON10003¬†Introductory Macroeconomics [3] Commerce - level 1 MAST10005 Calculus 1 [1]
Year 1 Semester 2 ECON10005 Quantitative Methods 1 [3] Commerce - level 1 ENGR10003 Engineering Systems Design 2 MAST10006 Calculus 2 [1]
Summer MAST10007 Linear Algebra [1] [2]      
Year 2 Semester 1 MGMT20001 Organisational Behaviour [3] Commerce - level 2 Commerce - level 2 MAST20029 Engineering Mathematics
Year 2 Semester 2 Commerce - level 2 Commerce - level 2 ELEN20005 Foundations of Electrical Networks ENGR20004 Engineering Mechanics
Year 3 Semester 1 Commerce - level 3 Commerce - level 3 COMP20005 Engineering Computation MCEN30017 Mechanics & Materials
Year 3 Semester 2 Commerce - level 3 Commerce - level 3 Commerce - level 2 or 3 MCEN30014Mechanical Design

[1] Students who have completed VCE Specialist Mathematics with a study score ≥27, go straight into Calculus 2. Linear Algebra is undertaken in Year 1, Semester 2. There is no need for the additional 12.5 points/summer enrolment.

Students with ≥38 in VCE Specialist Mathematics 3/4 should seek advice as to which mathematics to take.

[2] Students required to complete Linear Algebra in summer do so under the Community Access Program (CAP).

[3] Offered in both Semesters 1 and 2.

Commerce subjects Mechanical Systems subjects electives

Step 2: Master of Engineering (Mechanical)

Graduates with a Mechanical Systems major (with a 65% average) are eligible for a two-year Master of Engineering (Mechanical), or Master of Engineering (Mechanical with Business), or Master of Engineering (Mechatronics).

Sample Course Plan —Master of Engineering (Mechanical)
Year 4 Semester 1 MCEN90014 Materials MCEN30016 Mechanical Dynamics MCEN30018 Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics [2] MCEN90012 Design for Manufacture
Year 4 Semester 2 MCEN90009 Dynamics of Machines MCEN90026 Solid Mechanics MCEN90008 Fluid Dynamics MCEN90013 Design for Integration
Year 5 Semester 1 ELEN90055 Control Systems MCEN90015 Thermodynamics Group 1 MME elective MCEN90022 Capstone Project [1]
Year 5 Semester 2 Group 1 MME elective Group 1 MME elective Group 1 MME elective
Year 6 Semester 1 Group 2 MME elective      

[1] Available year long, or semester long — 25 points in either Semester 1 or 2.

[2] Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics is available in both Semester 1 and 2.

Further Information

Master of Engineering (Mechanical) Master of Engineering (Mechanical with Business) Master of Engineering (Mechatronics)



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Mitchell Schram

Graduate Engineer, Siemens

Master of Engineering (Mechanical) graduate Mitchell Schram admits to having a long term interest in how science can make our lives better; the very definition of engineering.

My love of machines both macro and micro, coupled with my love of mathematics, naturally led me down the path of becoming a mechanical engineer.

Mitchell believes that one of the most important things he has gained from his studies, is learning how to think like an engineer.

It might seem bizarre to say, but the mental process of approaching problems and solving them in an efficient, thoughtful and intelligent way is far more valuable than knowledge of the intimates of say fluid mechanics (my favourite subject!).